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If you have a kid that’s old enough to hold an iPad and understands how to scroll, then you know all too well that there are good apps for kids and bad apps for kids. A nine-year-old and Facebook? Yeah, that’s probably not a good match. Same for Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat, and a seemingly endless catalog of games that have altogether too much violence. But as the technology for app development progresses, we are seeing more responsive and user-centric apps being deployed in the market. (For example, there’s Babbel,  the leading app for language-learning). Notably, there are good apps for kids for better learning, apps that encourage creativity and curiosity and promote movement and physical activity. With the best apps for kids focused on answering unique learning requirements, special needs children also benefit.

For health experts, educators, and parents advocating for children’s health and well-being, that is excellent news.

a photo quote of Geoff Stead amid today's rising good apps for kids
Yes, we are seeing more responsive and user-centric apps being deployed in the market.

Good Apps for Kids: Technology as Partners for Raising Kids

Technology is undoubtedly here to stay. However, conversely, anything in excess can be detrimental to one’s overall well-being. Thus, without self-regulating mechanisms, kids and teens are prone to overindulge in technology. It’s a known fact that today’s youth devote a staggering number of hours online and on mobile devices.

Markedly, experts are noticing a surge in depression and anxiety in correlation to long hours spent on social media. And illnesses related to prolonged exposure to mobile devices and computer use are also on the rise. Particularly, backaches, neck and shoulder strain, painful wrists, headaches, and eye strain are some of the health issues kids deal with due to excessive exposure to mobile games.

Apps Are Here to Help Out

Certainly, amidst these realities, experts are urging parents to help kids and teens manage their exposure with the internet and mobile devices. With children’s health at stake, several companies and app developers stepped up to the challenge. Hence, we are now seeing a surge in the number of best apps for kids that go beyond the realm of social media and mobile games.

  • PBS KIDS Apps & More is the interactive supplement to PBS Kids Children Shows aired by the Public Broadcasting Service. With PBS KIDS, children as young as 2 years old are introduced to the wonders of science and technology or get acquainted with the great outdoors through fun and exciting games.
  • Science360 for Tablets is an app from the National Science Foundation. The app can be installed on tablets and give kids access to breathtaking images from NSF-funded researches and institutions. Science360 is one of the good apps for kids ages 12 and up.
  • VocabularySpellingCity was developed by LearningCity. Vocabulary Spelling City is one of the best apps for kids to build, expand, and retain vocabulary. Also, the app has a home-school connectivity program that supports learning continuity in school and at home. The app is available for download to both iOS and Android users.
  • Zamzee makes it to the list of good apps for kids. As part of Welltok, Zamzee is a movement meter that wants to make moving more fun. The program is comprised of two parts: a clip-on activity tracker and a website dashboard. Indeed, Zamzee gamifies physical activity and gives tangible gifts for every step, kick and jump that kids make.

And the List for Best Apps for Kids Continues

  • The Kids Yoga Challenge App by Go Go Yoga for Kids is an app designed to challenge kids with balance, mindfulness, flexibility and more. The app contains empowering, easy-to-follow yoga poses for beginners—which makes it one of the best apps for kids out there.
  • Just Dance Now is an app that can turn any room into a dancefloor without a console. The app was developed by Ubisoft and can be downloaded via Google Play and iTunes. With any internet-connected computer screen and the app installed on your smartphone, players can start dancing to their favorite tracks. Just Dance Now can be an excellent app for parents and kids to use for bonding together.
  • Hidden Curriculum for Kids is an app designed to teach social skills to kids with Autism Spectrum Disorder. With the use of flash card-style instruction, the software is a good app for kids that provides real-life scenarios and explanations for various social situations.
  • Choiceworks is a good app for kids with Autism Spectrum Disorders transitioning through multi-step tasks and routines. Using visual cues, kids can learn time management, planning, and self-awareness through the app.
  • Proloquo2Go is a simple yet effective augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) app developed by Assistive Ware. Parents, teachers, and speech therapists recognize Proloquo2Go as one of the good apps for kids with speech difficulties.
a photo quote of David Niemeijer amid today's rising good apps for kids
Proloquo2Go is one of the suggested best apps for kids with speech difficulties.

On Living in a Planet of Good Apps

Television and telephones were a defining technology for baby boomers—so is the advent of personal computers for the Generation Xers. For the millennials and centennials, smart and mobile devices have paved the way for the digital revolution. Notably, the emergence of mobile technology has made mobile applications a significant part of people’s lives. From online banking to booking a ride to health monitoring and more—the impact of technology on generations cannot be underestimated.

Indeed, with good apps for kids, parents can tap on technology as an ally in raising informed, tech-savvy, and well-adjusted individuals. So as the relevance of apps in people’s lives intensifies, it is safe to say that mobile technology is just starting.

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